Retrieved from "http://www.julian-fietkau.de/talks/5"

Talks

Introduction to LaTeX

2009-11-19, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Introduction to LaTeX

This talk was held in the KunterBunteSeminar, a workshop conducted by the students of the Computer Science department, University of Hamburg.

It was conceived as a general introduction to working with LaTeX for absolute beginners. I gave an overview of how LaTeX documents are structured and how packages are included. Next, I spent a lot of time going over the most important and well-known packages (such as KOMA-Script and Beamer). Also included were some handy tips and tricks that hopefully help making LaTeX fun instead of daunting.

At the end, we had a look at the LaTeX code of some example documents I prepared: a simple official-looking letter, a term paper, and the very slides for this presentation.

ZuuL - Creating an Adventure Game

2009-11-16, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

ZuuL - Creating an Adventure Game

This talk was conducted during the University Days of 2009, an event organized by the University of Hamburg. During those two days, it was held once each day by slightly different teams. On the first day, Patrick Schmolke held the first part, Christopher Schewe the second and I the last one; on the second day Oliver Bestmann took over for Patrick.

During the University Days, high school aged students had the opportunity to visit the various departments of the university, listen to talks and take part in projects. We showed our visitors the results from the Software Development practical course, which we had done some months prior.

The first part was ZuuL, the game we had developed, which we then explained and played with. Next we talked about software development in a team, which obstacles we faced and how we employed Extreme Programming techniques to overcome them. At the end, we explicated the idea of game design and talked about opportunities in that industry, relating to computer science and otherwise.

Introduction to Subversion

2009-08-28, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Introduction to Subversion

This rather short (20 minutes) talk was held by me in the Software Development practical course where I was supervised by Eugen Reiswich.

By humorously showing the pitfalls of software development in a team without source control, I engaged the audience in the problem that software like Subversion tries to solve. I then gave a very brief introduction on how it works and then spent a little more time on how it is used and what practices were relevant for our project.

The talk was a little on the short side (this was planned as such in consideration of the limited development time we had in the course), but was very well-received for focusing on the "why and how do I use it" rather than the "how does it work".

Project Natal

2009-06-24, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Project Natal

This was a 5 minute talk held by me in the Human Computer Interaction course conducted by Professor Oberquelle.

It's a short introduction into the then-known facts (and rumors) about Microsoft's Natal. Specifically, I briefly talked about the cameras and the technical setup. Half of the five minutes were spent watching the official trailer.

This talk happened a few weeks after the initial announcement of Natal, so there wasn's very much information available.

Polyglots

2009-06-24, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Polyglots

This talk was held during the Lightning Talk session in the KunterBunteSeminar, a workshop conducted by the students of the Computer Science department, University of Hamburg.

Explaining a rather simple example step by step, I introduced the participants to the idea of polyglot programs. I showed how some typical polyglot techniques work by highlighting them on a hybrid C/PHP/bash program that fits on one slide.

After that, we briefly looked at some rather frightening examples of polyglot programming combining many languages.

This talk was aiming for amusement over learning. As such, it was rather light-hearted, though well-received. Trivia: It set that day's record for most slides to successfully go through in 5 minutes (50 slides in this case).

Free Software for Beginners

2009-06-16, VMP5, University of Hamburg

Free Software for Beginners

This talk was prepared and held by various volunteers (Alexander Beifuß, Kai Hildebrandt, Tim Krämer and me) for the "Bildungsstreik" event in 2009, where regular university courses were supplemented by talks and courses created by students for students.

In this talk, we introduced the audience to the idea of free software and its importance. Afterwards, we played a game of "guess which is copyleft" as can be seen on the slides.

The State Pattern

2009-06-09, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

The State Pattern

This talk was held by Janina Nemec and me in the "Concepts of object-oriented programming languages" course by Axel Schmolitzky and Christian Späh. It was not an ordinary talk, but a 120 minute teachlet.

We guided the participants through solving a software design problem using the "state" design pattern. This was, in teachlet tradition, accomplished by offering them a clear-cut problem and discussing several possible solutions, before talking about the state pattern and finally live implementing the solution together.

We slightly exceeded our planned time for the teachlet, but the immersion worked so well that hardly anybody noticed.

Rethinking the Progress Bar

2009-05-06, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Rethinking the Progress Bar

This 5 minute talk was held in the Human Computer Interaction course by Professor Oberquelle.

It briefly discussed research conducted by Chris Harrison of Carnegie Mellon University. Specifically, I talked about how the relative speed changes in a progress bar affect its perceived overall speed, and what conclusions UI designers and programmers could make.

Alternative Operating Systems

2009-04-29, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Alternative Operating Systems

This talk was held in the KunterBuntesSeminar, courtesy of the computer science students of University of Hamburg.

Rather than delving into details, I conducted a fast-paced overview over the alternative and hobbyist operating system landscape. Well-known projects like the BSDs were covered, as well as niche projects like MenuetOS.

After we were through the slides, I invited the audience to play with the various systems in VirtualBox. Some wouldn't boot, but most of them could be studied first hand.

Together with the last few interested people I was kicked out by the janitor at 9 PM...

RFID - Capabilities and Dangers

2008-11-24, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

RFID - Capabilities and Dangers

In this talk I gave an overview of the status quo concerning RFID and related technologies.

Since it was conducted in the "Computer Science and Society" course by Professor Valk, there was a strong focus on social implications of RFID, possible erosion of privacy and lobby organizations, though I also briefly spoke about job opportunities for CS graduates. A short technical introduction for people unfamiliar with the technology was also given.

The presentation included a live demonstration of a portable RFID card reader, which was able to read RFID tags from students who courageously volunteered to have their wallets scanned.

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