Retrieved from "http://www.julian-fietkau.de/talks/3"

Talks

Gamification

2011-06-29, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Gamification

This talk was held as the first of three accompanying short talks for the Interaction Design course.

I gave an introduction into the world of "gamification" and explained how people came up with the idea of enriching application software with playful elements. The content of this talk was limited, as it was meant to be a starting point for further individual research. The discussion among the audience concerning viable implementations and more examples worked well to complete the event.

Operant Conditioning

2011-06-08, Dept. of Psychology, University of Hamburg

Operant Conditioning

This talk was held by Annika Kolaska, Martin Selke and me during the seminar course for Allgemeine Psychologie 2. It is modeled after chapters 6 and 7 from James E. Mazur: Learning and Behavior. I was responsible for the last third about the two studies.

In the first part, Annika introduced and explained the fundamentals of operant confitioning as well as several relevant experiments. In the second part, Martin further illuminated and expanded on that knowledge. I then showed two studies in which operant conditioning was employed in two distinct fashions.

Interaction in the Blogosphere

2011-05-24, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Interaction in the Blogosphere

This talk was held in the course Computer-Supported Cooperative Work.

I started by explainig "blogging" as such and what it's about, then going into interaction patterns frequently found on blogs. Among those were comments and their structure, Trackbacks and Pingbacks as well as social media widgets. I ended with two scenarios concerning anonymous blogging and the use of blogs for knowledge management by enterprises, respectively, as well as a brief look at a possible future for blogging.

Temporal logic and bisimulation

2011-02-02, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Temporal logic and bisimulation

This talk was held in the course Formal foundations of informatics 3. By explaining some simple examples, we showcased trace equivalence and bisimulation in transition systems. Afterwards, we introduced several temporal logics, examined how their respective term equivalence relates to trace equivalence and/or bisimulation and finally proved the relations.

Thunderbird and Notify OSD

2011-01-27, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Thunderbird and Notify OSD

This lightning talk was held in the KunterBuntesSeminar. I introduced the topic with the first slide and then showed live how to transition from Thunderbrid's own notifications to using Notify OSD (and also the indicator applet, incidentally) on a typical Ubuntu Linux desktop.

For the downloadable slides here, a summary of what to do has been added.

8 puzzle

2011-01-24, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

8 puzzle

This presentation was held in the "Introduction to knowledge management" course. For a three-week-long assignment, our group consisting of three students programmed an A* based solver for the 8 puzzle in Racket/Scheme. This accompanying slide was created half as a visualization aid and half as a joke, since we didn't see the need for any slides, but creating a presentation with "up to ten slides" was compulsory.

Complexity vs. Usability in Desktop Software

2011-01-15, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Complexity vs. Usability in Desktop Software

This talk, held in the "Interactive Systems" course, has been about complexity and usability in software. Specifically, I've talked about how requirements for functionality and complexity have changed and how they have influenced usability concerns. Additionally I showcased several methods and ideas for software developers and UI designers to constructively deal with increasing complexity and still keep the software usable and enjoyable.

A small C puzzler

2010-12-02, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

A small C puzzler

This Lightning Talk was held at the KunterBuntesSeminar organized by computer science students at the University of Hamburg.

In these slightly more than five minutes I showed a small snippet of C code, explained referencing and dereferencing operators as well as macros, and posed a tricky question about a bit of C code that combines those concepts in a particular way. I then proceeded to explain the compiler behaviour that caught my fellow students by surprise by looking at the 99 ISO standard.

Tunneling with sshuttle

2010-12-02, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Tunneling with sshuttle

In this Lightning Talk, held at the KunterBuntesSeminar, I presented a small tool called sshuttle and compared it to other, more well-known software solutions.

The Department of Computer Science at the University of Hamburg uses, among other things, IP-based authentication for access control. This means that there are some resources, e.g. on the web, which can only be accessed from the Dept. of Computer Science IP subnet. To access these resources from home, it is necessary to create and use some sort of connection to the CS net. This can be accomplished by connecting to the VPN or by establishing an SSH connection. The tool I showcased, sshuttle, promises a new way to solve this problem by tunneling IP traffic through a simple SSH connection using iptables. This idea has several advantages over the alternatives.

Specific perceptions: motion, space, depth and size

2010-11-22, Dept. of Psychology, University of Hamburg

Specific perceptions: motion, space, depth and size

This talk was held in a course on cognitive psychology, together with two fellow students. My part was the one in the middle, about depth perception.

After the part about motion (in which I was only slightly involved), I introduced depth perception as a curious feat of the mind, in light of our retinas being two-dimensional. I then proceeded to explain how to feel the muscles in the eye, showed a variety of depth cues in still images and videos and explained binocular depth perception as a result of shifted retinal images. My part of the talk ended with a very brief neurological look at depth perception. We used the Ames room as a depth-based illusion as a transition to size and scale, the third an final part of the talk.

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