Retrieved from "http://www.julian-fietkau.de/talks"

Talks

My interests, previous work, and ideas for the future

2015-06-02, Faculty of Media, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar

My interests, previous work, and ideas for the future

I held this talk in the undergraduate thesis writers' seminar of the HCI group. The idea was to introduce myself and my research interests.

Impacting the social presence of virtual agents by scaling the fidelity of their speech and movement – Thesis defense

2015-01-23, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Impacting the social presence of virtual agents by scaling the fidelity of their speech and movement – Thesis defense

Virtual agents are constructs that fulfill human or human-like roles in virtual environments, but are directly controlled by software instead of real humans. They have use cases such as presenting information, demonstrationg actions or simulating a social environment. If a real person perceives them as sufficiently human-like, they may induce social phenomena like empathy, competition or conversational turn taking, even if the real person is consciously aware that the agent is purely virtual.

My master's thesis explores the influence of technical fidelity in terms of their speech and movement. Both of these two variables were assigned different implementations of varying technical sophistication, from text-to-speech output to fully recorded voices and from a completely rigid idle body to a high-quality relaxed idle animation based on motion capturing data. The various combinations were tested in an experiment using a head-mounted virtual reality display in order to measure their influence on perceived social presence. In this talk, I described the experiment and summarized its results.

Rapid prototyping of interaction concepts in higher HCI education

2014-09-15, HDI 2014, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

Rapid prototyping of interaction concepts in higher HCI education

In teaching HCI (Human-Computer Interaction), there is the persistent challenge of constructing practical exercises with interesting goals while staying focused on HCI and not getting lost in technical details. In the introductory course "Interaction Design" at the University of Hamburg, students have three weeks to conceptualize and implement prototypical interaction concepts for the game Neverball. In contrast to most other HCI introductory courses, they do not design mock-ups, but produce actual concrete software. To make this possible within the three-week timespan, Neverball has been extended with a TCP-based interface. This renders the costly familiarization with the game's source code unnecessary and the students are able to concentrate on their interaction prototypes. We recount our experiences from several iterations of the project and describe our methods during its execution. The results shall support other teachers and lecturers in the area of HCI in creating similar praxis-oriented exercises with results that "can be touched".

These slides were used for the short presentation at HDI 2014 (6th conference on university didactics of computer science).

A Miracle Cure to Boost Self-Efficacy and Enhance Study Competence

2014-01-28, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

A Miracle Cure to Boost Self-Efficacy and Enhance Study Competence

This Lightning Talk took place at the KunterBuntesSeminar organized by computer science students at the University of Hamburg.

In five minutes I demonstrated a simple method for computer science (and related) students in Hamburg to improve their study situation for very little effort. I provided a link to the official collection of documents that govern the individual degree programmes and showed how one can find the documents that are relevant to oneself. I ended the talk with a plea to spend the short amount of time that it takes to read these documents once and for all.

Developing a software tool for interpreting Gymnasium students' grades – Thesis defense

2014-01-09, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Developing a software tool for interpreting Gymnasium students' grades – Thesis defense

Students at the Gymnasium (Germany's highest tier of general education) are often eager to get an overview of their scholarly accomplishments to be able to make predictions about their future options, but the system is rather complex.

For my bachelor's thesis in the HCI programme, I have designed and developed an application to support the students and encourage self-assessment. It is capable of calculating average grades and pointing out encouraging as well as dangerous trends.

In this talk in the HCI seminar, I presented my empirical results and development work.

Developing a software tool for interpreting Gymnasium students' grades

2013-06-13, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Developing a software tool for interpreting Gymnasium students' grades

Students at the Gymnasium (Germany's highest tier of general education) are often eager to get an overview of their scholarly accomplishments to be able to make predictions about their future options, but the system is rather complex.

For my bachelor's thesis in the HCI programme, I plan to develop a software system to support the students and encourage self-assessment. To that end, it will calculate average grades and point out encouraging as well as dangerous trends.

In this talk in the HCI seminar, I presented my idea and the project plan for the development.

Gamification – Where do we stand?

2012-07-02, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Gamification – Where do we stand?

This guest talk took place in the Interaction Design lecture of Prof. Dr. Kindsmüller.

In 15 minutes I gave an overview of the general concept and limitations of gamification. I started out with a general clarification of the term, and continued by showcasing it using a real-world example. Using the Gartner Hype Cycle, I offered a partial explanation for the problems that gamification has been associated with. I concluded with a very brief venture into the area of game design.

Musik: McFarland Beats - Slipped, used under CC-BY

Unemployment from a psychological perspective

2012-06-12, Dept. of Psychology, University of Hamburg

Unemployment from a psychological perspective

This talk was conducted in the auxiliary seminar for the course Employment- and Organizational Psychology by a group of three students of which I was one.

After a short clarification of some important vocabulary, we supplied an overview of the employment-related legislation of the last ten years in Germany, with a strong focus on the Hartz laws. As a little intermezzo, we showed an excerpt from Volker Pispers' cabaret programme concerning Hartz IV. After that, we explained the details of a study about the subjective wellbeing of long-term unemployed people in relation to an initative called Arbeitsbeschaffungsmaßnahmen. We concluded the talk with a plenary discussion on some specialized questions.

Complexity and Usability 2012

2012-05-10, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Complexity and Usability 2012

There was a time when software couldn't do much and was easily understood in full. What has changed and what has stayed the same? Software is supposed to accomplish more and be easier to use at the same time – is that an irreconcilable contradiction? Is there a "new simplicity", or does the path lead into a jungle of complexity?

From the UNIX philosophy, the personal computer revolution and the Web 2.0 up to recent smartphone apps, I examined the overall development of the interface complexity of software. Especially, I scrutinized the concept of "simplicity" critically. On the basis of these observations and incorporating theoretical knowledge from interaction- as well as game design, recent examples and models for constructively dealing with functional complexity were explained.

This talk took place in the HCI research colloquium.

Streets4MPI (Parallel Programming Project)

2012-04-04, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Hamburg

Streets4MPI (Parallel Programming Project)

This talk marks the official end of the Parallel Programming project.

We presented our results by explainig the algorithms and technical underpinnings of our software, showing visual examples and comparing runtime data for different parallelization scenarios.

RSS